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WINNING LETTER

Fight for your children’s future

I am 20 years old and had a baby boy last year when I was in grade 12. I was taking care of my boy and failed my matric. But I re-registered to re-write at the end of the year. I would like to encourage young girls to take a stand and fight for their children’s future. Relying on a man is not an option and our parents are not going to be around forever. The only key to a great career and a brighter future is through education. I believe in myself and learned from my mistakes. Not that my son is a mistake - he is a blessing, but having him so early in my life was wrong. Now I am going to school to give him a bright future. I don’t want to be a statistic, but an individual who made a difference instead of feeling sorry for myself.

- Nokhuthula Nkosi, Sebokeng, Gauteng

 

Schools not meant to produce babies

I’m giving the Minister of Education gigantic applause and a salute for not promoting maternity leave for learners. She said that learners were at school to learn and I’m adding to that; schools are not meant to produce babies. If a learner wants to be a mother she must be independent and be able to do things for herself and the baby. Likewise, a guy should look for a job to feed his family and himself.

- Salome Mogale Sekete , Atteridgeville, Gauteng

Real men support children

It is unfair for men to make women pregnant and desert them. Statistics show that most children are abused by their stepfathers. If men could stick to their responsibilities as fathers, it would contribute to the reduction of sexual abuse to children. Poverty would also decrease if fathers are there to support their children. I urge all fathers to be responsible and help the government to fight poverty and child abuse by being there for their children. Real men don’t desert their children!

- Bethuel Mokhari, Zebediela, Limpopo

Keeping our children safe and sound

Your article Keeping Our Children Safe and Sound has inspired me. I am a young man who has always had a passion to stop violence against children here in Lebowakgomo. After reading your article, I’ve decided to start early childhood development here. Many children take drugs because they have nothing to do during their after school hours. I have a plan to start play groups, nursery schools and after school centres where children can learn and play. Your article came as a first step, because now I know where to go for help.

- Ernest Leboho, Lebowakgomo, Limpopo

You too will grow old

The saying goes: “Let no granny’s tear fall to the ground, for you will be cursed.” No one can deny that the elderly are our guardian angels. To see young people mistreat or abuse them is a hard pill to swallow. They helped us to learn and make something of our lives. We need to show our gratitude. Society should stop despising and punishing them simply because they are old and wrinkled. It is no crime to grow old. To all those who mistreat them, don’t forget that you too will grow old one day.

- Joseph Sithole, Tweefontein, Mpumalanga

What can we do to help government?

We must stop relying on government’s promises and start doing things that are fruitful in our own lives. Government can only help those who are also doing everything they can to help themselves. Government will not be able to stop crime if we don’t help them. They can’t stop women and child abuse unless we help them to combat such barbaric activities. We must not always think of what government can do for us, but rather what we can do to help our government.

- Dumazi D Forster, Malamulele, Limpopo

Overspending on matric farewell

I know how much matric farewell functions mean to grade 12s. The problem is overspending for one day’s function. On the other hand, there’s the problem of not having fees to register at an institution of higher learning. Please save those rands for registration rather than buying expensive farewell clothes. The choice is yours. Would you like to pursue your career and get skills or join the mass of unskilled people?

- Peolwane Kleinbooi Mabaso, Bothaville, Free State

They deserve a chance

I appeal to government to give amnesty and remove the criminal records of ex-offenders who finished their sentences in correctional centres as part of their punishment. Offenders are also human and they deserve to be given a second chance to prove that they rehabilitated successfully. I also urge the private sector and government to give young ex-offenders a second chance by giving them jobs without considering their criminal records.

- Thomo Nkgadima, Lynn East, Gauteng

Volunteer and gain experience

You've passed your matric or qualified at a tertiary institution. You try to find a job, but they ask for experience, because most companies only want to employ people who have experience in a particular job. Voluntary work is the best way to gain work experience. So don't hesitate, go for voluntary work at your nearest police station, clinic or hospital. You may even be offered a permanent job after a while. Just try it and see the results.

- Nonhlanhla Cele, Matatiele, Eastern Cape

Taking the first step

As a former volunteer, I would recommend that all unemployed people gain experience, training and knowledge through volunteering. I am currently a receptionist and have gained reception skills and experience through being a volunteer at the Boksburg Child Welfare. Thanks to Vuk’uzenzele I have learnt that I can volunteer as an administrator for the South African Police Service, which will enable me to be employed as an administrator in future. To all South Africans, I want to say let’s take the first step and try to better our lives.

- Meredith Goeieman, Delmore Park, Gauteng

We receive hundreds of letters and e-mails from you. Everyone will get a response. Remember to include your name and surname.
PLEASE NOTE: To win a radio/cd player or radio set, include a physical address and a contact telephone number.

Write to: Vuk'uzenzele, Private Bag X745, Pretoria, 0001, or e-mail: vukuzenzele@gcis.gov.za.

If you don't want to have your real name published, you may use a different name, but please include your real name and address to us.